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(Created page with "The '''Tower of Babel''' ({{lang-he|{{Hebrew|מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל}}}}, ''Migdal Bāḇēl'') as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant...")
 
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The '''Tower of Babel''' ({{lang-he|{{Hebrew|מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל}}}}, ''Migdal Bāḇēl'') as told in [[Book of Genesis|Genesis]] 11:1-9 is an [[origin myth]] meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.<ref name="Metzger2004">{{cite book|last1=Metzger|first1=Bruce Manning|last2=Coogan|first2=Michael D|title=The Oxford Guide To People And Places Of The Bible|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=amlXOOaSuLMC|accessdate=22 December 2012|year=2004|publisher=Oxford University Press|isbn=978-0-19-517610-0|page=28}}</ref><ref name="Levenson">{{cite book
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The '''Tower of Babel''' (Hebrew: מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל, ''Migdal Bāḇēl'') as told in [[Book of Genesis|Genesis]] 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.
|last= Levenson
 
|first= Jon D.
 
| editor1-last = Berlin
 
| editor1-first = Adele
 
| editor2-last = Brettler
 
| editor2-first = Marc Zvi
 
|title=The Jewish Study Bible
 
|chapter=Genesis: Introduction and Annotations
 
|date= 2004
 
|page=29
 
|publisher=Oxford University Press
 
|isbn =9780195297515
 
|url=https://books.google.com/?id=aDuy3p5QvEYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Jewish+study+Bible#v=onepage&q&f=false
 
|ref=harv}}</ref><ref>{{cite book |last1=Graves |first1=Robert |last2=Patai |first2=Raphael|date=1986 |title=Hebrew Myths: The Book of Genesis |publisher=Random House|page=315|url=https://books.google.com/?id=4sqWAwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Hebrew+Myths:+The+Book+of+Genesis.+Random+House#v=onepage&q&f=false|isbn=9780795337154 }}</ref><ref>{{cite book |last1=Schwartz |first1=Howard |last2=Loebel-Fried |first2=Caren |last3=Ginsburg |first3=Elliot K. |date=2007 |title=Tree of Souls: The Mythology of Judaism |publisher=Oxford University Press |page=704 |url=https://books.google.com/?id=60iVk1p8Y9IC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Tree+of+Souls+:+The+Mythology+of+Judaism:+The+Mythology+of+Judaism#v=onepage&q=Tree%20of%20Souls%20%3A%20The%20Mythology%20of%20Judaism%3A%20The%20Mythology%20of%20Judaism&f=false|isbn=9780195358704 }}</ref>
 
   
According to the story, a united [[human race|humanity]] in the generations following the [[Genesis flood narrative|Great Flood]], speaking a single language and migrating eastward, comes to the land of [[Shinar]] ({{hebrew|שִׁנְעָר}}). There they agree to build a [[city]] and a [[tower]] tall enough to reach [[heaven]]. God, observing their city and tower, confounds their speech so that they can no longer understand each other, and scatters them around the world.
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According to the story, a united humanity in the generations following the Great Flood, speaking a single language and migrating eastward, comes to the land of Shinar (שִׁנְעָר). There they agree to build a city and a tower tall enough to reach [[heaven]]. God, observing their city and tower, confounds their speech so that they can no longer understand each other, and scatters them around the world.
   
Some modern scholars have associated the Tower of Babel with known structures, notably the [[Etemenanki]], a [[ziggurat]] dedicated to the [[Mesopotamian]] god [[Marduk]] by [[Nabopolassar]], the king of [[Babylonia]] circa 610 BCE.<ref name="Harris 2002 50–51">{{cite book|title=Understanding the Bible |first=Stephen L. |last=Harris |authorlink=Stephen L. Harris |publisher=[[McGraw-Hill]] |year=2002 |pages=50–51 |isbn=9780767429160 |url=}}</ref><ref>{{cite magazine|title=Die Stadt, an deren Freuden man nicht satt wird |first=Michael P. |last=Streck |work=[[Damals]] |volume=Special volume |year=2006 |pages=11–28 |language=German}}</ref> The Great Ziggurat of Babylon was {{Convert|91|m|ft|-1}} in height. [[Alexander the Great]] ordered it to be demolished circa 331 BCE in preparation for a reconstruction that his death forestalled.<ref>[[Diodorus Siculus]], 2.9.9; [[Strabo]], ''Geography'', 16.1.5.</ref><ref>{{cite journal|last1=van der Spek|first1=Robartus|title=Darius III, Alexander the Great and Babylonian Scholarship|journal=Achaemenid History|date=2003|volume=XIII|url=https://archive.org/stream/DariusIiiAlexanderTheGreatAndBabylonianScholarship2003/VanDerSpek2003DariusIiiAlexanderTheGreatAndBabylonianScholarship#page/n3/mode/2up|publisher=Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten|location=Leiden|pages= 289–346}}</ref> A [[Sumer]]ian story with some similar elements is told in ''[[Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta]]''.
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Some modern scholars have associated the Tower of Babel with known structures, notably the Etemenanki, a ziggurat dedicated to the Mesopotamian god Marduk by Nabopolassar, the king of Babylonia circa 610 BCE. The Great Ziggurat of Babylon was 91 metres (300 ft) in height. Alexander the Great ordered it to be demolished circa 331 BCE in preparation for a reconstruction that his death forestalled. A Sumerian story with some similar elements is told in ''Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta''.

Revision as of 19:38, June 22, 2018

The Tower of Babel (Hebrew: מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל, Migdal Bāḇēl) as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.

According to the story, a united humanity in the generations following the Great Flood, speaking a single language and migrating eastward, comes to the land of Shinar (שִׁנְעָר). There they agree to build a city and a tower tall enough to reach heaven. God, observing their city and tower, confounds their speech so that they can no longer understand each other, and scatters them around the world.

Some modern scholars have associated the Tower of Babel with known structures, notably the Etemenanki, a ziggurat dedicated to the Mesopotamian god Marduk by Nabopolassar, the king of Babylonia circa 610 BCE. The Great Ziggurat of Babylon was 91 metres (300 ft) in height. Alexander the Great ordered it to be demolished circa 331 BCE in preparation for a reconstruction that his death forestalled. A Sumerian story with some similar elements is told in Enmerkar and the Lord of Aratta.

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